7.19.2011

The Post About $40 Target Gift Card Giveaway

I'm presenting a webinar for work next week entitled "What Every Parent Should Know About Social Media."

I'd like you rabbit readers to do a bunch of the work. K? K.

Rabbit sidebar: How much do I loathe reply text messages that just read "k"? Spoiler: I loathe it hard.

My employer probably won't pay you for being my webinar researcher, so let's have a giveaway!
Winner:
$40 Target Gift Card (GIVEAWAY CLOSED/WINNER ANNOUNCED SOON)

How To Enter:
Leave a comment answering the question:

What's a tip you would give parents about social media?

**2 Extra Credit Entries**

Each of the following will give you 1 extra entry. Make sure to leave a separate comment for each, whether you're doing it for the first time or you've already done it in the past.


1. "Like" Jamie's Rabbits on
Facebook.

2. Follow Jamie's Rabbits on
Twitter.


Important Details: Open to anyone in the US or Canada. Must enter before 11:59pm CST on Monday, July 25 to qualify. Winners will be chosen randomly using Research Randomizer and announced next week. Obviously, anonymous folks can't win unless they leave a name in the comment.  

P.S. Although I spend money at Target like I'm a trophy wife with a generous trust fund, they don't know the first thing about this blog or this giveaway.  

Meanwhile...We have two winners for the iTunes/Pandora Giveaway!
$25 iTunes Winner: #200 = Jenny - "I LOVE Adele's new album!"  
Pandora 1-Year Membership: #149 =  Debra F. (who won for following on Twitter) "The last album I bought was Stevie Nick's 'In Your Dreams' and I do love it." 
Congrats ladies! Email me at jamiesrabbits@gmail.com to collect your bounty!

{image: fhoke}

458 comments:

  1. I would say that they should protect their children's pictures and not make them completely public on Facebook or myspace.  If they want to share pictures with friends, adjust the privacy settings so that they're only visible to those select few.

    mami2jcn at gmail dot com

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  2. I like you on FB with my username Mary Happymommy.

    mami2jcn at gmail dot com

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  3. I follow you on Twitter (mami2jcn)

    mami2jcn at gmail dot com

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  4. I'd tell parents to make sure they can monitor their children's profiles at any given time, that they alwys have the password.  I would also suggest that thier childrens profiles are as private as possible (friends only) and have a rule that they cannot friend strangers or random people.

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  5. I am a fan of Jamie's Rabbits on FB 

    KerriFletcher

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  6. I follow Jamie's Rabbits on Twitter

    kitty_kerri

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  7. Make sure to use privacy settings to restrict who can access and post on your child’s website. Don't use your child's name when tagging photos.dld

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  8. I "like" you on FB (Darcy Odden)

    dlodden at frontiernet dot net

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  9. I follow on Twitter (darcy1956)

    dlodden at frontiernet dot net

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  10. I would tell a parent to monitor what their child does. Restrict sites and set computer usage limits. It shouldn't take over your childs life and there are plenty of creeps out there that you need to keep them safe from. Talk to your child about the dangers of strangers and social media.. not everyone is who they say they are. Educate your child not to give any personal information, this can cause personal harm or lead to identity fraud. Just be careful. And, 'it's not official until it's facebook' Oh my, facebook stuff isn't the end of the world... don't get to caught up in the social media life. :)  

    Love you, Jamie!

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  11. With our stepdaughter, the rule is always "mom and dad have access to all your passwords and sites, and can log in at any time for any reason." That keeps her on her toes, and John and her mom are diligent about checking in randomly. Fortunately they work together as far as that goes with the kiddo.

    The other rule when she's at our house is there is a night-time cutoff for the internet. Her mom does not do that, but it's something we've chosen to make a rule for her. Bedtime is set, and the netbook and phone are put away at that point. She hates, it, but really, what is a teenager doing online at midnight anyway? (Or me, for that matter.)

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  12. Louise BrouilletteJuly 19, 2011 at 7:41 PM

    I would urge parents to know their young children's passwords and accounts.  As for teenagers, I'd suggest that they open a dialogue with their children.
    louiseb130@aol.com

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  13. Both my kids have FB accounts and first, I made sure that I became a friend of each, so as I can keep my eye on their accounts.  In addition, the profile info is very limited and their privacy setting is limited.  Their ages we also changed to older ages. 
    Thanks so much.
    rickpeggysmith(at)aol(dot)com

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  14. I'm a FB friend (Margaret E. Smith)Thanks
    rickpeggysmith(at)aol(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
  15. I'm a twitter follower (peg42)
    Thanks
    rickpeggysmith(at)aol(dot)com

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  16. I would say kids under 16 have no right using it.

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  17. Monitor your children's internet usage including twitter and facebook.

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  18. try to keep your children off of it as much as possible!

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  19. I have my kids passwords, access to their sites, and spyware on their desktop to ensure they are not visiting sites that they shouldn't be in
    pauline15_01(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  20. I'm a facebook fan (pauline1501)
    pauline15_01(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  21. I follow on twitter (pauline15)
    pauline15_01(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  22. Make sure you have access to your kids Twitter, Facebook, My Space pages so you can see what they are saying and doing.

    abfantom at yahoo dot com

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  23. caution children not to give personal info to unknown friends and followers

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  24. like you on facebook

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  25. follow on twitter

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  26. I would tell them to watch their children closely on social media places and don't worry if they complain about it. It's more important to keep them safe.
    swiener1[at]tampabay.rr.com

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  27. A few ideas-

    1. If they are involved in games within the social media, I think parents should be very specific to tell their children that they should not friend people even it will help them in the game.  Safety is more important than the next level.  Most kids know not to friend random people, but something like that can seem not random, not like they are a stranger.

    2. Not only have access to their items and friend them, etc., but interact with them on there, so other people can see that you are monitoring because they can see what you have commented on, retweeted, etc., etc.  Parents who are visible on their children's profile will keep them safer.

    3.  YouTube - be careful what they post and know what your kids friends are posting.  Just because you don't let your child post videos about themselves, doesn't mean their friends don't post videos of them.

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  28. One more thing, get other people to help monitor.  For example, if the mother isn't into Faceboo, but the aunt or the youth leader or the older cousin is enlist them to help.  The more eyes the better.

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  29. like you on fb as susan wiener. swiener1[at]tampabay.rr.com

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  30. Firstly, I would caution parents of younger children (pre teens and younger) to not to feel pressured to get caught up with the socal media scene. I know that Facebook allows 13+ to have a page, but I know of a few parents who've let their 10 year old have a page (lied about youth's age on FB). Once you've opened Pandora's Box, it's opened. Secondly, I agree with many of the other commenters about "friending" their child and having open access to their passwords.

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  31. "like" you on FB

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  32. Twitter follower

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  33. I would advise them to moniter their kids social media websites. Also place limits on time they can spend on a social media site.

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  34. facebook follower melissa N
    melisa0072 at gmail dot com

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  35. Twitter follower @melissarin
    melisa0072 at gmail dot com

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  36. I'd tell parents to give their kids some freedom, but make sure their kids' profiles are private!
    abishop09 (at) gmail (dot) com!

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  37. There is no need to get your kids onto FB or twitter too early.

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  38.  "Like" Jamie's Rabbits on Facebook. 

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  39. I am @sohamolina  twitter follower----eddiem11@ca.rr.com

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  40. I would advise parents to talk with their kids, and make sure that they understand some of the dangers of social media

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  41. Privacy settings are very important, limit what can be seen of your children. If you're children are using social media, monitor what information they are giving out, photos, personal information and who they're 'friends' are. Stress to them the importance of safe/secure accounts and why information should be limited. Also, caution them about opening links from unknown sources or even from friends/family if they look suspicious.

    ubrewme@yahoo.com

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  42. I'm a twitter follower: @SereneMoments 

    This is my first visit.... Very nice to meet you. Cute blog!

    ReplyDelete
  43. keep a very close eye on it

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  44. Make sure you know what sites you're kids are getting into

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  45. twitter follower @rsmc1

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  46. Keep up to date with what your child is posting and who they are interacting with on Facebook and other social media sites.
    starhoney111@gmail.com

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  47. Kids will always find ways to gain access to social media and use it that may be outside the guidelines set forth by their parents, so my tip is to help them understand what information, especially sensitive info., should be kept private so it wouldn't compromise their own identity and safety as well as for others and explain to them that once they post information online they can not get them back even if they delete the information from a site.
    lyndadawinda1074 at yahoo dot com

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  48. twitter follower of yours as sherri2345.

    swiener1[at]tampabay.rr.com

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  49. remind them that if they say it on the internet it doesn't just disappear, it's somewhere. forever. 

    make sure they'd be cool with their parents, teachers, priests, rabbis, and future spouses and children reading/seeing what they posted someday. 

    ReplyDelete
  50. I follow you on twitter.  ID: Lyndadawinda
    lyndadawinda1074 at yahoo dot com

    ReplyDelete
  51. I LIKE you on Facebook.  ID: Lynda Castillo
    lyndadawinda1074 at yahoo dot com

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  52. I tell my children that I need their passwords and id's for all their social media accounts. I also have Norton Security that allows me to Keep track of what sites they are going to on the computer.

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  53. like on fb-becky watts davis
    bdavisnc at gmail dot com

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  54. following on twitter-bdavisnc88
    bdavisnc at gmail dot com

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  55. My sons are 17 and 20 now.  We didn't have internet at our house until about 1 1/2 years ago because of where we live.  I finally got internet from verizon from a modem, so we have internet, but not unlimited.  I have found with Facebook, that the allow me to be their friend if I remain quiet and don't comment and "stalk" their friends as one of my sons says.  It is a happy balance where I get a bit of insight into their world, I feel like it is a privilege to some extent, but I don't cross the line of commenting on their page, except once in a while a "like" or downloading pics their friends have posted of them.  We didn't have texting or facebook when they were younger.  In hindsight, it really was a blessing that we couldn't get internet when they were younger; it kept us all away from a lot of temptation and pure timewasting for the most part.  Technology, the internet, cell phones, etc. are a great asset to our society if used responsibly.  Parents, however, have to pay attention to what their kids are doing, and not ignore them, in whatever type of online activity or texting is going on,

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  56. follow you on fb
    Robin Scott

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  57. follow you on twitter
    robinlscott

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  58. Monitor your kids when they're online surfing especially when they are small.

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  59. Like" Jamie's Rabbits on Facebook. jessiekatie S

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  60. Follow Jamie's Rabbits on Twitter. 
    @tcarolinep

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  61. It can be a great thing and a breach of security at the same time.  Don't let too much info out there is my advice
    tvollowitz at aol dot com

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  62. Be careful about what you post and who you talk to. I wish I could tattoo this on my in-laws' foreheads.

    Followed you on Twitter.

    Thanks for checking out my guest post on Amanda's blog yesterday. I appreciate it. Good to meet you!

    ReplyDelete
  63. Social Media tip: Teach children that their information should be private.

    janetfaye (at) gmail (dot) com

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  64. I like Jamie's Rabbits on FB - Janet Fri
    janetfaye (at) gmail (dot) com

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  65. I follow you on Twitter - Janetfaye

    janetfaye (at) gmail (dot) com

    ReplyDelete
  66. half_blue_sky@yahoo.com

    Always know your children's passwords. No passwords, no accounts!

    ReplyDelete
  67. if your kid is under 18 INSIST you are their fb friend and have their password. that way they will not share too much personal info, post inappropriate pictures, and you know what they are up to and who they are hanging out with. do not use it as a stalking tool, more like a way to keep an eye on them.

    ferriza2(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  68. fb fan: xferriza2 (Danielle b)

    ferriza2(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  69. twitter follower xferriza2 ferriza2(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  70. I would tell them to keep up to date and know what their child is doing online.

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  71. I think that is a wonderful compromise!  I am a youth leader at my church and I watch out for my youth on Facebook as well.  I will comment or like something every so often just so they remember that I am there.  If they post something really out of the way, I'll send them a private message.  That may sound like the parent's job, but some of the parents have told us they won't say anything to their kids on FB or about it.  That it is our job or their aunt's job to monitor them and keep them in line.  

    So many kids these days use social media as their outlet for all their frustrations.  They no longer have diaries and whatnot, they use FB, Twitter, etc. as that.  This is obviously dangerous because once it it out there you can't get it back, but it can also be a insight for parents into their children.  Monitoring what they are saying and commenting/liking every so often is a good way to let them know you are watching and that you care.  

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  72. SIMPLE....DON'T ALLOW IT UNTIL THEY ARE OFF TO COLLEGE

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  73. I would say it's very important to avoid being overly restrictive when it comes to social media sites, and instead to sit your kids down and teach them the importance of being safe and careful about what they post and who they talk to; at the same time, it's a good idea to keep all family computers in a central location so you can have some level of awareness of what sites the kids are using at any given time.

    gkaufmanss at yahoo dot com

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  74. I like Jamie's Rabbits on Facebook: Geoff K

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  75. I follow Jamie's Rabbits on Twitter: @guettel78

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  76. Keep the computer in a public room and check in on your child often.

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  77. I would tell them to go into the facebook, and gmail accounts of everyone they love and require https. (For facebook, go to https://www.facebook.com/editaccount.php?drop, click on "Account Security" and then make sure the first checkbox is clicked ("Browse Facebook on a secure connection (https) whenever possible").)It's probably getting away from the point, but if you really want to freak them out and have the time to set up and test everything, set up an wireless access point with no encryption and sidejack a couple of sessions with the Firesheep plugin for firefox. (http://codebutler.com/firesheep)

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  78. Also, I am your friend on Facebook (and Google+, and I would be on Spotify if you linked it to your FB account)...

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  79. ...and Twitter.

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  80. I would advise parents to create a family account first for kids and not let kids join too many sites at once. There's really no need and it can become a huge time waster!
    Thank you for the giveaway :)
    hurdler4eva(at)gmail(dot)com

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  81. Make sure they are not posting their cell # anywhere.

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  82. I like Jamie's Rabbits on Facebook, my FB name is Amanda Moore

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  83. Talk to your kids about social media and all the dangers that come with it. Also set limits and know the passwords.

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  84. I follow @JamiesRabbits on Twitter - I'm AmberGoo

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  85. follow on fb as charline stanley

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  86. The tip I would give parents would be to monitor what their children are doing and also educate them on things such as privacy, spam, and predators.

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  87. 3 words of wisdom: MONITOR, MONITOR, MONITOR!

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  88. My tip: keep the computer in a family common room where they don't have too much privacy so that you can keep an eye on them from time to time.  Also don't try to keep them from it but encourage them to use it, just inform them of the dangers of it and try to set up parental controls if it allows you to set settings.  Social networking has its advantages and benefits and if you tell a kid they cannot do something, they will find a way to do it haha so just let them but do it in a safe way

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  89. following on twitter @IHeartCupcakes5:disqus 

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  90. I would say make sure to have all of you child's login information and check in on them regularly when they're young... especially messages. You never know who they could be talking to. Make sure their privacy settings are up to date and let them know about the dangers of putting too much online!

    wawillis at asu dot edu

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  91. I would tell kids much like the outside world...Don't talk to strangers.

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  92. I “liked” you on Facebook.  THANKS for the AWESOME GIVEAWAY!!!
     
    Scott Martin
    spmartin122@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  93. Use a program that protects your child and that you can monitor.
    Thanks for the chance.
    mogrill12@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  94. I would tell them just to make sure they monitor what photos that their child is sharing on the web and who he/she is talkin too on the web. Make sure your child knows the risks of sharing photos and talking to strangers in chat rooms.

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  95. have a spyware. help them setup security settings. teach them what to post and not to. don't chat with strangers. 

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  96. liked you in fb
    amramazon280 at yahoo dot com

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  97. twitter follower
    amramazon280 at yahoo dot com

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  98. I suggest that parent's be aware of who their children befriend on social media networks. If you don't know the person, don't speak to them. You never know who's on the other end of the conversation! Also, make sure all of their privacy settings are set to "friends only" or something similar, so that way no one can find out private information about them.

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  99. My biggest suggestion is to really pay attention to what your kids are doing online.

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  100. I "Like" Jamie's Rabbits on Facebook.

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  101. my tip would be sitting down and having an honest conversation about the dangers that are out there, discussing what's appropriate and what's not.

    sarah at realtorsd.com

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  102. i like you on fb as sarah d
    sarah at realtorsd.com

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  103. i follow you on twitter as sarahndavis
    sarah at realtorsd.com

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  104. I would say to monitor their sites and set their privacy settings on their sites to just allow friends.

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  105. know that there are no guarantees of privacy
    mverno@roadrunner.com

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  106. i like you on fb susan v
    mverno@roadrunner.com

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  107. I would tell them to be sure to have antivirus and spyware protection on their computer because alot of social media sites can put spyware on your computer. I would also let them know that if they have kids they can monitor what they are looking at to help keep them safe. My email is jaimelea143@yahoo.com

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  108. i liked jaimes rabbits on facebook. my facebook name is jaime mchugh

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  109. i am following jaimes rabbits on twitter. my twitter name is jaimelea143

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  110. Call me old fashioned, but if they fit under the child category then should they really be on social media sights? 

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  111. Follow you on twitter!

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  112. Like you on Facebook!

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  113. Hi! :)  I'd say that while I'm not a parent, you can still figure some things out about that.  With social media, you can learn things, you can meet new people, you can have a fun waste of time, you can win things.  But, it can be scary and you can loose your info/privacy.  If you have a child, they absolutely have no business being on any type of social media site until they are older.  And when they hit that older age, they must be watched and you must know what they are doing.  Yes, kids should have privacy too, but to a certain extent.  You are the parent, you have to know what they are doing, and explain to them the risks behind it.

    Lois
    OV_099@yahoo.com

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  114. it is very public

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  115. "Like" Jamie's Rabbits on Facebook.

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  116. i would tell them to make sure they are private! So people can't stalk you!

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  117. i like you on fb courtney bella

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  118. twitter follower meandbells

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  119. Make them keep their information private and be a friend with you.
     littlegray88 at yahoo dot com

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  120. I like you on Facebook!
    littlegray88 at yahoo dot com

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  121. I like you on Twitter 
    littlegray88 at yahoo dot com

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  122. Make your children aware of the dangers of social media sites, tell them to keep their information private and to only friend their actual friends, and moniter their activity.

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  123. I would tell parents to make kid's facebook settings private so no one can see any of their pics or wall.

    pokergrl8 at gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  124. i like you on fb as amanda sakovitz
    pokergrl8 at gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  125. follow you on twitter @aes529

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  126. If your children use it, pay attention to what they are saying.  I know it's spying but it's our job to protect them and keep them safe.  thank you!

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  127. My tip is remember that once you put something into a place where someone else can see it, it will never be private again.

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  128. I follow on twitter @rsmstahley

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  129. I would suggest to monitor your children's internet usage and put up privacy settings.
    austma7@aol.com

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  130. Don't let kids on social media too early (I enforced MySpace's 13 years, but really think it should be older), and then supervise and make sure you are 'friends' so you can see what's going on.  Serious conversations about dangers of strangers AND downloading stuff...

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  131. Oh yes, and I totally agree with private profiles and pictures!

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  132. to make sure their kids don't add strangers on websites like facebook, etc.

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  133. My parents used the TV as baby sitter, way too much. I would encourage parents not to use social media the same way.

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  134. I don;t think young children should be using social media at all; older kids should be monitored at all times.

    dwellenstein at cox dot net

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  135. I like you on Facebook as Debbi Otto Wellenstein.

    dwellenstein at cox dot net

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  136. Stay informed about the childs activity and be sure they dont have too much personal information or pictures floating around.

    kport207 at gmail dot com

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  137. Meredith DavenportJuly 20, 2011 at 10:36 PM

    Carefully monitoring their privacy settings is key.  You don't want anyone you or your child don't know to follow, friend, link, or do any other such verb to them.

    ReplyDelete
  138. Meredith DavenportJuly 20, 2011 at 10:36 PM

    I already "like" you on FB.

    ReplyDelete
  139. Meredith DavenportJuly 20, 2011 at 10:36 PM

    I already follow you on Twitter.

    ReplyDelete
  140. When I look back on how I was as a child, I would be a concerned parent. When MySpace came out I did find myself twice meeting up with two random people. I ended up becoming good friends with one of them. But, it could have easily been anyone that I was meeting up with. I didn't tell my parents who I was meeting either. I'm not sure as a parent how you protect your child from situations like this. I was always so annoyed anytime my parents told me to not talk to random people.

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  141. Already Twitter friends :] HelloRG

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  142. You should teach your kids about how to deal with cyber bullies and predators on social media sites. Also, warn them against sharing too much personal information on those sites.
    luckyjd2k at gmail dot com

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  143. I'm following you on twitter @giveawaysetc

    ReplyDelete
  144. I would tell them not to post pictures of other children on their facebook or other social media sites. I would tell them not to give out personal information such as what school they go to, what number they wear when they play sports and what state, or town where they live.

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  145. Don't be scared!
    Thanks so much!! Janna Johnson jannajanna@hotmail.com janna@feedyoupig on gfc

    ReplyDelete
  146. Make sure to use privacy settings to restrict who can access and post on your child’s account

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  147. I "Like" Jamie's Rabbits on Facebook.

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  148. Be aware of all the different privacy settings that exist. Because there are a lot of them.

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  149. Homero GutierrezJuly 21, 2011 at 8:30 AM

    Just tell your children be careful what you share.

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  150. Make sure you set and check your privacy settings on FB.

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  151. Following @JamiesRabbits on twitter.mrcheapo

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  152. Like" Jamie's Rabbits on FB.mrcheapo

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  153. i would tell parents to moniter their child's pictures and make sure they are appropriate. also to make sure they have privacy settings up

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  154. We don't allow our children on the computer/internet anyway without permission and supervision.  If a parent does allow their children to be on a social network, the parent should be the one to set up the account and password (password for the parent only).  The parent should sign their child in and monitor everything on their account, friends list, etc.  I am disturbed by what I have seen posted on social networks by children who obviously don't have parents who monitor them.

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  155. limit time on it

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  156. Be completely aware of the applications being used, and information being shared by everyone who knows your family. Your best friend may decide to use your family as an example. Make sure your friends and/or extended family knows your feelings and to what extent they can use your family. Limit your child's time using social media and remember that social media isn't just what's found on the Internet ... their cell phones are avenues to social media now.

    Linda.Stewart(at)drakesoftware.com

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  157. Like on Facebook

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  158. I am following on FB
    jalyssa982003 at yahoo dot com

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  159. I say to monitor their children's activities on anything such as FB. Have their account information in order to check up on them whenever you like. Or, don't even allow them to have an account if you aren't sure they are mature enough for it.
    jalyssa982003 at yahoo dot com

    ReplyDelete
  160. Lots of good ideas here that I agree with completely.  My granddaughters are in their late teens and all family members are their "friends" on Facebook.  They know not to post specific personal information and they don't "friend" strangers.

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  161. Keep the privacy settings high on facebook so no one you don't know can see anything like pics updates etc.  Limit who can be friends to make sure no problems arise.

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  162. I would say keep pictures of your children private. and don't always post exactly what and when you are doing something. It gives  perverts or stalkers opportunity to get close to your children.
    mommy2skie@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  163. follow you on facebook; Misty VanEpps
    mommy2skie@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  164. follow you on twitter; mommy2skie
    mommy2skie@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  165. I think having honest, frank discussions are important.  Your kids are going to use social media, so we might as well teach them how to be responsible users.  Set the privacy settings to "friends only" and encourage them to only post things that they'd be comfortable having their teacher/parent/minster etc read.

    ReplyDelete
  166. Follow you on Twitter (sableonblond)

    ReplyDelete
  167. Jonathan SpillmanJuly 21, 2011 at 4:17 PM

    My name is Jonathan Spillman. nice.ace[ at]hotmail[dot]com
    1 tip? I have several.
    1. Do NOT make any of your personal information available via Facebook, Twitter or Facebook.
    2. Do NOT click on everything you see.
    3. TALKING IN ALL CAPS IS NOT COOL JUST BECAUSE IT MAKES IT EASIER FOR YOU TO READ WITH YOUR IMPAIRED VISION.
    4. Do NOT stalk my friends on Facebook. Not cool. xD
    I liked you on Facebook (Jonathan Spillman). I followed you on Twitter (/jonathonpatrick)

    ReplyDelete
  168. Jonathan SpillmanJuly 21, 2011 at 4:18 PM

    available via Facebook, Twitter or Myspace (accidentally put Facebook twice.)

    ReplyDelete
  169. Mandatory: A tip for parents it to thoroughly explain to your children through videos, news articles the pitfalls of social media and how it can harm someone.
    mnsanchez15@yahoo.com

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  170. I follow you on FB as MichelleSanchez
    mnsanchez15@yahoo.com

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  171. I follow you on Twitter @llehciMMichell 
    mnsanchez15@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  172. I would tell the parent to be careful if their child uses social media. I would tell them to block off as much as possible from the children because porn and predators are on there waiting.

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  173. twitter follower/dahliamomma

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  174. I like your fb page/letesshaw

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  175. These sites have age limits for a reason. There is not need for kids in elementary school to have facebook pages. If you don't follow the rules and allow them to, make sure you know their passwords and are in the room when they use them.
    brittneydejajason at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  176. fb fan (brittney p)
    brittneydejajason at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  177. Monitor your children's account.

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  178. Follow Jamie's Rabbits on Twitter @Missybeez80 

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  179. I would tell them to leave the computer in the livingroom

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  180.  "Like" Jamie's Rabbits on Facebook

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  181. Definitely not disclose the actual name of the child or post pictures of them-- although it may be hard but definitely keep it within the friends and family circle.  I'd also block everything online - there's no need for kids to be using twitter or facebook or internet for that matter (if they are not of at least high school age)

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  182. I'm a facebook fan of Jamie's Rabbits
    yuukiimi(at)gmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
  183. I'm following you via Twitter (yuukiimi)
    yuukiimi(at)gmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
  184. My tip is have there kids wait till there a certain age before allowing me them to have a social media site. Also if they are in the younger age range make sure the computer they are using is in a room you will be in. Make sure the kids know not to give out there phone numbers or addresses to people who ask for it. 
    shilobeedy@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  185. Be sure your kids know the importance of not posting personal information about themselves.
    Sit down and have a talk with them about it.
    Thank you.
    barbara dot montyj at gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  186. Already like you on Facebook (Barbara Montag)

    ReplyDelete
  187. Already follow you on Twitter @JalapenoMama

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  188. tip: don't let children give out personal info like phone number and address
    xoxoxo

    ReplyDelete
  189. like you on FB as deanna time
    xoxoxo

    ReplyDelete
  190. follow on twitter  dlw447
    xoxoxo

    ReplyDelete
  191. know what sites your children are visiting and who they are chatting with!

    ReplyDelete
  192. Enter FB contests!
    dolniaks[at]consolidated[dot]net

    ReplyDelete
  193. I'm a teacher and I see the benefits and the harm with social media. First and foremost, I don't think parents or educators should see it as an enemy. It isn't. It is the current and the future so we adults must just deal with it. Why not use it to our advantage. It may be a great way to keep in touch with the kids in our lives (of course human interaction is by far the best interaction over online interaction yet I digress)

    My biggest message to parents is that it is important to teach kids that the internet is permanent and that they need to be careful about what they say and do and how they portray themselves.. It will be difficult developmentally for some tweens and teens to fully understand it's impact but show them the news story of the kids who are facing jail time for comments they posted about a peer on facebook. Tell them about the guy who got fired from his job for creating a blog that commented on all the mean things he did to guests at a hotel he used to work at.  Teach them empathy and how the person they wrote about is real with emotions. Nothing should be written online that they can't say in person to a person's FACE.  A big talk about integrity could tie in with social media responsibility.

    Lastly, parents should pay attention. Watch their kids and their interaction with others online. I know at my school our hands are tied. We can't control or punish actions done at home online but we deal  with the results and it is incredibly sad to see the amount of cyber bullying done right under Parent's noses.

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  194.  I like you on facebook under Jl Johnson
    luckyseattlemom at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete
  195. I follow you on twitter @I_heart_Pokey:disqus luckyseattlemom at gmail dot com

    ReplyDelete

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